Advertisement

Accelerated corneal crosslinking for treatment of progressive keratoconus in pediatric patients

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the safety and efficacy of accelerated corneal crosslinking (CXL) in patients with progressive keratoconus aged 18 years or less.

Methods

A total of 28 eyes from 19 patients with progressive keratoconus aged 18 years or less were enrolled. We divided participants into 2 groups according to corneal thickness (CT). Group 1 included 13 eyes of 8 patients with CT ≥450 µm; group 2 included 15 eyes of 11 patients with CT <450 µm. Each participant underwent accelerated CXL using 10-minute ultraviolet A irradiance at 9 mW/cm2 for a total energy dose of 5.4 J/cm2. The efficacy and safety of the procedure were assessed postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with Pentacam and visual acuity.

Results

In uncorrected visual acuity, group 1 showed a statistically significant +0.12 logMAR improvement at 3 months postoperatively (p = 0.003), and in group 2, there was a statistically significant +0.3 logMAR improvement at 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.005). In best-corrected visual acuity, there was a +0.15 logMAR (p<0.001) and +0.22 logMAR (p = 0.005) improvement in group 1 and group 2, respectively, at 12 months postoperatively. All mean keratometric values including K1 and K2 dropped by at least 1 D or remained stable (< ± 1 D) in both groups after accelerated CXL treatment.

Conclusions

The findings showed that accelerated CXL treatment seems to be effective in slowing or halting the progression of keratoconus and that no permanent apparent complications are noted 6 months after accelerated CXL.

Eur J Ophthalmol 2017; 27(3): 319 - 325

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

DOI:10.5301/ejo.5000848

Authors

Döndü M. Ulusoy, Emre Göktaş, Necati Duru, Ayşe Özköse, Mustafa Ataş, İsa Yuvacı, Hasan B. Arifoğlu, Gökmen Zararsız

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: No financial support was received for this submission.
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has conflict of interest with this submission.

This article is available as full text PDF.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.

Authors

Affiliations

  •  Department of Ophthalmology, Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, Kayseri - Turkey
  •  Department of Biostatistics, Erciyes University, Kayseri - Turkey

Article usage statistics

The blue line displays unique views in the time frame indicated.
The yellow line displays unique downloads.
Views and downloads are counted only once per session.

No supplementary material is available for this article.